Gas Peaking

Facilitating the transition to a low carbon future.

Gas peaking plants reach full output capacity in less than 4 minutes, provide a sustained delivery of electricity to the grid according to system needs, and will play a vital role by keeping the lights on as we transition to a low carbon future.

Gas reciprocating engines can be easily converted so that low-carbon hydrogen is the fuel source. STOR’s current portfolio of peaking assets is located in the north west of England which is at the forefront of the UK hydrogen transition.

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Why do we need gas peaking?

The UK power market is expected to become increasingly dominated by renewable and reserve power technologies as we decommission carbon intensive baseload plant and transition to a low carbon future in energy, with gas peakers capturing a significant proportion of the growth.

  • Increased system volatility from intermittent and unreliable renewable energy generation will drive growing demand for flexible reserve power technologies.
  • Rapid response gas peakers have significant advantages over OCGTs and CCGTs due to shorter delivery times, better efficiency for shorter durations and higher frequency load profiles.
  • National Grid sees flexible generation growth as critical to accommodate the peaks and troughs in demand on the system.

  • With the government’s new target for 40GW of wind by 2030, gas peakers will be even more necessary to ensure the lights don’t go out.

TYPICAL SITE STATS

20

SITE CAPACITY (MW)

8

GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

2500

TOTAL HOURS AVAILABLE PA

Why reserve energy?

The change to energy generation and consumption is being driven by three powerful trends: the arrival of increasingly affordable distributed power technologies, decarbonisation of the world’s electricity network through the introduction of more renewable energy sources, and the emergence of digital technologies. Reserve energy will continue to play a vital role in supporting these trends as we transition.

Decentralisation

The nation is transitioning from relying on fewer large, centralised generators to multiple small-scale local generators connected to the grid at distribution level. The growth of these distributed energy resources such as renewables, and the increase in “prosumers” (individuals who both consume power and produce it) is hugely increasing the complexity of the distribution grid.

Decarbonisation

The rapid deployment of low-carbon technologies such as wind and solar is making it increasingly difficult to forecast variable generation, creating challenges around grid stability, congestion and market volatility.

Digitisation

Greater numbers of connected devices and smart sensors are allowing rapid decision-making on dynamic and nodal prices, while intelligent control systems and internet-enabled software are helping optimise power plants and the grid.

About
STOR Power

OUR EXPERIENCE

The management team has a cumulative 100+ years of experience in the energy and infrastructure sectors.

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